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Sebelius sends letter to governors encouraging Medicaid expansion

Posted on July 11, 2012 | No Comments

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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius published a letter on Tuesday urging governors to participate in the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA’s) Medicaid expansion, which the Supreme Court ruled must be optional for states. Under the Medicaid expansion provision, the ACA offers coverage to everyone at or below 133 percent of the federal poverty line. The letter also announced meetings for both state and federal officials to discuss ACA implementation.

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After the measure to expand Medicaid failed in the Legislature this summer, the Ohio Controlling Board voted 5-2 to approve Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). This decision, which will likely be met by a multitude of legal challenges in the coming months, makes Ohio the 25th state to accept enhanced federal funding to help insure the state's most impoverished residents. Our map has been updated to reflect these changes.
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The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have released 2 new proposed rules related to the individual requirement to purchase health insurance (mandate). The IRS rule clarifies the requirement that nonexempt individuals maintain minimum essential coverage or make a shared responsibility payment (penalty). The CMS rule lays out specific exemptions to minimum coverage requirement, most notably that any person otherwise eligible for Medicaid under the new ACA eligibility expansion, but who resides in a state that has chosen not to expand, will not be subject to the shared responsibility payment. Stay tuned to HealthReformGPS for a detailed analysis of these rules in the future.
On December 10, 2012, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released a long-awaited set of frequently asked questions on Exchanges, market reforms, and Medicaid. We will post a further analysis of these FAQs in the near future, but we rush to post one question and answer because of its significance in relation to the Medicaid expansion...
Last week, Maine Governor Paul LePage (Republican) accused the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) of "delaying tactics," after CMS requested more information regarding Maine's Medicaid cuts. The CMS request, sent October 26, "could have been answered with a quick telephone call," according to a letter LePage wrote to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. The request will restart a 90-day review period for the agency to examine Maine's request to enact cuts to the state's Medicaid program. Maine's proposed cuts would impact over 27,000 low-income residents, ending coverage for 19- and 20- year-olds and reducing coverage for nonpregnant and nondisabled adults with incomes above 100 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL). Maine sent the original proposal to CMS on August 1 and asked the agency to review it before October 1.
This Update summarizes the CMS Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) document issued on December 10, 2012.
On December 10, 2012, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released a long-awaited set of frequently asked questions on Exchanges, market reforms, and Medicaid. We will post a further analysis of these FAQs in the near future, but we rush to post one question and answer because of its significance in relation to the Medicaid expansion...