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OPM multi-state plan draft application implies plans may participate in part of a state

Posted on September 27, 2012 | No Comments

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A draft of a multi-state plan application indicates that the Office of Personnel Management intends to allow the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA’s) multi-state plans to initially participate in part of a state, as opposed to the entire state. This comes as a surprise, as the ACA states that multi-state plans must be offered “in all geographic regions…” According to the ACA provision, these multi-state plans must be operating in 60 percent of states in the first year of an insurance plan’s participation. By the fourth year, they must scale up and offer coverage nationwide. These plans will be certified to be offered in all exchanges, so they will not need to apply for separate state certifications.

Comments on the draft application are due to OPM by October 22, 2012.

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