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NIHCR and HSC release paper on state benefit mandates and the ACA

Posted on March 5, 2012 | No Comments

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Written by researchers at the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) and commissioned by the National Institute for Health Care Reform (NIHCR), the policy analysis describes the range of current state benefit mandates and federal health reform law provisions that will affect state approaches to benefit mandates in nongroup and fully insured small-group health plans. The analysis also examines Maryland, a state with a wide array of benefit mandates, to illustrate how mandates interact with essential health benefits.

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