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KFF study finds most states cover optional preventive services

Posted on September 25, 2012 | No Comments

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According to a survey released by the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF), preventive health services are well-covered by state Medicaid programs, despite the fact that these services are optional for nonelderly adult Medicaid enrollees. The KFF study reported that 44 states covered a least 30 out of 42 optional preventive services, with 25 states covering 40 or more of the optional preventive services. These optional services include 1) screening for cancer and sexually transmitted infections, 2) services related to chronic conditions such as diabetes, and 3) immunizations. There was significant variation with regard to cost-sharing requirements for these services. Of the 13 states that covered all of the 42 preventive services, only five of these states covered these services without cost sharing.

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) makes available financial incentives for covering these preventive services. State Medicaid programs, for example, may receive an increased federal Medicaid matching rate if they cover immunizations recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and certain preventive services recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

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