HHS announces new workforce grants

Posted on August 31, 2012 | No Comments

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Yesterday, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius announced $58.7 million in grants to strengthen training for health professionals and increase the size of the American health care workforce. The 254 grants support nursing workforce development, interdisciplinary and geriatric education and training, centers for excellence health professions schools, and dentistry. For a list of grant awards by state, click here.

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In Healthcare, the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce provides detailed analyses and projections regarding healthcare fields, occupations, and their wages. In addition, the report provides a discussion regarding the important skills and work values associated with healthcare fields and occupations. Finally, the report addresses the implications of findings for racial, ethnic, and class diveristy of the healthcare workforce for the coming decade.
Strengthening and modernizing the health care workforce was a major goal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The law contains dozens of provisions related to health care workforce issues, including national workforce policy development (what the law refers to as workforce “innovations”), increasing the supply of primary care physicians and nurses, strengthening the dental health workforce, education and training of the workforce, and expanding teaching health centers. This Implementation Brief focuses on the provisions of the ACA dealing with the education, training, and support of public health and allied health care workers; previous Briefs have focused on the other topics.
Strengthening and modernizing the health care workforce was a major goal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The ACA contains dozens of provisions related to health care workforce issues, including strengthening primary care, national workforce policy development, increasing the supply of health care workers, education and training of the workforce, and other supports and improvements to the existing workforce. This Implementation Brief focuses on those provisions of the ACA that specifically target the strengthening of the nursing workforce.
Providing access to high quality oral health care is an important component to improving the health of people in the United States. A person’s oral health is connected to that person’s overall well-being, and can be an indicator of serious health problems. Often, symptoms of disease first show up in the mouth, and certain infections in the mouth, if untreated, can spread to other parts of the body. However, the current supply of dentists, particularly in medically underserved areas, is inadequate. As of September 2009, there were 4,230 dental health professions shortage areas, within which more than 42 million people live. The U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) estimates that it would take an increase of more than 9,500 dental professionals in order to reduce the ratio in shortage areas to 1 dental professional for every 3,000 individuals.
Strengthening and modernizing the health care workforce was a major goal of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). The ACA contains dozens of provisions related to health care workforce issues, including strengthening primary care, national workforce policy development, increasing the supply of health care workers, and more. This Implementation Brief focuses on those provisions of the ACA that specifically target the strengthening of the primary care physician workforce.
Strengthening and modernizing the health care workforce was a major goal of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). The health reform law contains dozens of provisions related to health care workforce issues, including national workforce policy development (what the law refers to as workforce “innovations”), increasing the supply of health care workers, education and training of the workforce, strengthening primary care, and other supports and improvements to the existing workforce. This Implementation Brief focuses on national workforce policy; future Briefs will focus on the other topics listed.
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius has announced more than $70 million in new grants to help support nursing workforce development. The money will be used to support additional nursing education and training, nursing school loan programs, and promoting diversity in the field. For more information about nursing workforce issues, click here.
Today, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius announced $290 million in new funding from the Affordable Care Act (ACA) for the National Health Service Corps (NHSC) Loan Repayment Program to help increase the number of primary care providers in medically underserved areas. These funds will allow $60,000 in loan debt forgiveness to medical, dental, and mental health primary care providers who commit to practicing 2 years in an NHSC-designated service area. Additionally, the ACA allows for more leeway in administering NHSC funds, such as the opportunity to work full-time or half-time, as well as total loan forgiveness for a commitment of six years.
The Department of Health and Human Services has announced $250 million in investments to develop the primary care workforce under the Prevention and Public Health Fund created by the health reform law. The Obama Administration also posted a fact sheet at HealthReform.gov outlining how this funding fits into efforts designed to expand capacity and bring providers to medically underserved communities.