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Third Party Resources

White paper outlines potential King v. Burwell scenarios

Posted on January 14, 2015

Consulting firm Leavitt Partners released a white paper outlining several scenarios that Congress, the states, and the administration could take should the Supreme Court rule against the administration in the King v. Burwell case. Under the first scenario Congress could amend the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in a way that establishes the subsidies were meant for all Americans regardless of who establishes the exchange. In the second proposed scenario Congress would pair a fix to the ACA with “material concessions”, such as the employer mandate or premium tax credit thresholds. In the third scenario outlined in the white paper, Congress would take no action regarding the Court’s decision, leaving it up to states to create their own contingency plans. The Leavitt white paper also suggests several fall-back ideas that may be under consideration by the administration as well as potential state reactions.

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Studies examine impact of possible King v. Burwell decision

Posted on January 13, 2015

Two studies by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the RAND Corporation came up with similar findings regarding the Supreme Court’s potential decision in the King v. Burwell case. RWJF speculates that a ruling in favor of King, eliminating subsidies in federal exchanges, would shrink the nongroup insurance market by 9.7 million nonelderly adults and increase the number of uninsured Americans by 8.2 million in 2016. The RAND study also predicts that a ruling in favor of King could cause a 47 percent increase in premiums in federally facilitated marketplaces (FFM). The implications of the court’s decision could ricochet beyond those directly losing subsidies, affecting higher income individuals and even people who obtain coverage outside of the marketplaces.

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Study examines coverage disparities under the ACA

Posted on December 18, 2014

A study by the Urban Institute finds that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) may reduce, but not eliminate health care coverage disparities. The report projects that under the ACA uninsurance rates will fall for each racial/ethnic group, narrowing coverage differences between whites and each minority group, except for blacks. If, however, all states were to expand their Medicaid programs, researchers predict that uninsurance rates would fall further for all racial/ethnic groups, with blacks experiencing a marked reduction.

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New report details health spending in 2013

Posted on December 5, 2014

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Office of the Actuary published its annual health care spending report in the policy journal, Health Affairs. The report shows that total health care spending in the U.S. increased 3.6 percent in 2013. However, this increase was slower than that of 4.1 percent in 2012, and the share of GDP devoted to health care spending has remained at 17.4 percent since 2009. The deceleration in health care spending growth can be attributed to a slower growth in private health insurance and Medicare spending. Slower growth in spending for hospital care, investments in medical structures and equipment, and spending for physician and clinical care may also contribute to the low overall increase.

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AMA adopts new policy to increase insurance coverage

Posted on November 12, 2014

A new American Medical Association (AMA) policy encourages policymakers of all levels to focus their efforts on working together to identify realistic coverage options for adults currently in the coverage gap, especially in states that are not expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Given their concern with the high number of low-income adults who remain uninsured in states that have opted not to expand their Medicaid programs, the AMA suggests that these states consider using waivers to expand coverage. The organization also urges states to publicly report annually on efforts to cover the uninsured.

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Report finds state differences in EHBs

Posted on October 23, 2014

A new report from University of Pennsylvania researchers, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, finds that significant state variation exists in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) essential health benefits (EHB), which insurers must cover to offer plans on the exchanges. 45 states consider chiropractic care an EHB, 26 states include autism spectrum disorder services in their EHB package, and only five states considered weight loss programs and acupuncture as EHBs. The report states that the variation in EHB requirements is mostly a result of allowing states to determine their own essential health benefit package by using a “benchmark plan” already offered in the state as a model.

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Survey assesses impact of high deductibles

Posted on October 14, 2014

A new poll conducted by the The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research suggests that high deductibles remain a significant barrier to health care for many privately insured Americans. The survey finds that of privately insured adults under age 64, about one in five said they don’t go to a doctor when they are sick despite having health coverage. A similar number of survey respondents reported going without preventive care and cutting back on retirement savings, or having to use all their savings for care. These issues were particularly acute among the 26 percent of respondents with high deductible plans. Consequently, about half of those surveyed said they preferred higher premiums over higher out-of-pocket costs.

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Georgetown releases report on post-ACA network design

Posted on September 23, 2014

Researchers at Georgetown University’s Center on Health Insurance Reforms (CHIR) conducted a six-state case study to assess changes in the network design of plans offered through the health insurance marketplaces, as well as the response of state officials in the face of consumer and provider concerns. The report finds that insurers have narrowed their networks, relative to what they offered in the past, however states and insurers reported few consumer complaints about the ability to obtain medically necessary care in-network. Most of the study states are unlikely to take action to change their standards for network adequacy, however, half of the states studied will require insurers to provide better, up-to-date provider directories, so that consumers can better understand which providers are in which plan networks before they buy.

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10.3 million adults estimated to have gained coverage under the ACA

Posted on July 24, 2014

A new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that an estimated 10.3 million adults gained insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).  The study, performed by Harvard researchers, reported a 5.2% decline in the uninsured rate during the first open enrollment period.  Data analyzed for this project included Gallup polls and ACA enrollment statistics from the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

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Two new ACA studies released

Posted on June 26, 2014

A new study published in Health Affairs found that open enrollment for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) should coincide with the tax filing season. The researchers argued that consumers are more likely to make better decisions with their health coverage when taxes are on their minds, not the stresses associated with holiday spending. Currently, ACA open enrollment for 2015 is scheduled for November 15, 2014 to February 15, 2015.

Another study from the Urban Institute indicates that Medicaid expansion was associated with a reduction in the number of uninsured individuals as of March 2014. The study, which relied upon data from Urban’s Health Reform Monitoring Survey, found that states expanding Medicaid saw a drop in the uninsurance rate by 4%, whereas states that did not expand Medicaid saw a 1.4% reduction. Unlike the ACA open enrollment period, individuals eligible for Medicaid can enroll in the program at any point in a year.

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